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This Week’s History, 1890: Vancouver Experiences First Royal Visit

The Duke of Connaught was the seventh of Queen Victoria’s nine children.

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Queen Victoria did not reach Vancouver during her 64 years of reign. However, her son was first visited by members of the British royal family on May 22, 1890.

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It was short and took less than a day. However, the public was excited and longed for a glimpse of the royal family.

I’m really worried.

“Due to the zeal and stupidity of some individuals, the gate at the southern end of (Wharf) was closed with a design that clearly shuts out the crowd,” the Daily News-Advertiser reported on May 23.

“But the crowd was indignant at the effort to keep them out and swarmed at the pier and broke the gate.”

Prince Arthur was widely known by his title, the Duke of Connaught. He arrived with his wife, daughter, and his aides after sailing across the Pacific from Yokohama, Japan, on board the Canadian Pacific steamship SS Abyssinian.

The Royals spent May 21st in Victoria and set sail for Vancouver early the next morning. SS Abyssinia circled Brockton Point at around 9:45 am and docked at CP Wharf, which struck a band to save Her Majesty.

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Mayor David Oppenheimer gave a speech on how Vancouver citizens “continue to be His Highness’s most loyal and obedient servant.” The Duke replied in his own speech, which described how he was “totally surprised to see the size of the building” in such a young city.

“He wanted all the prosperity to be in Vancouver and the great state where it was one of the major cities,” the news advertiser reported.

Then collaborated with Duke. I went to Hotel Vancouver for lunch, break and dinner. The next morning, they slept on a special CPR train that departed for a cross-Canada trip and were on their way back to England.

Duke of Connaught, circa 1912. Downey / Vancouver Archive AM1376-: CVA 130-6 jpg

The train had two private cars and a baggage car, Saskatchewan and Matapedia. Two journalists arrived from Backeast and wrote about Connaught’s trip across Dominion, but from Connaught’s assistant, Sir John McNeill, it was the “Queen’s Train” and “absolutely. No one is allowed unless it is necessary. ” To continue it. “

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Therefore, the media had to wait for a regular CPR passenger train to catch up. The world of Vancouver was enthusiastic about the royal visit, but on May 23, ironically, “As Sir John called, the Queen’s train is terribly exclusive and you can’t travel it.” I said with all my heart.

Prince Arthur was the seventh of Victoria’s nine children. He was born on May 1, 1950 at Buckingham Palace and spent many years in the British Army. Most of it was done in India.

He first came to Canada in 1869-70, serving as a military officer in Montreal, helping to subdue one of the Fenian raids on Canada by supporters of the Republic of Ireland in the United States.

He made his second trip to Vancouver in March 1906 and was appointed Governor General of Canada in 1911.

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In September 1912, he made his third trip to Vancouver. This is a three-day event with the new Vancouver Court (now Vancouver Art Gallery) and his honor.

Various arches have been set up to welcome him around the city, including from the Forestry Group, which set up the original Lumberman’s Arch on Pender Street near Hamilton. After his visit, it was moved to Stanley Park, where it rotted and continued until it was burned in 1947. The current arch was built in 1952.

The Duke of Connaught was governor until he returned to England in 1916. His name remains in local equipment such as Connaught Park, the British Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught), and the army associated with the Beatty Street Armory in downtown.

Another Canadian Regiment, Princess Patricia Canadian Light Infantry Regiment, was named after his daughter.

Duke married Princess Luise Margaret of Prussia, and the couple had three children. However, according to Wikipedia, he also continued a long-term “contact” with Winston Churchill’s mother, Jennie’s sister, Leonie, Lady Leslie. He died on January 16, 1942 at the age of 91.

jmackie@postmedia.com

Prince Arthur of Connaught, September 1912. Stuart Thomson / Vancouver Archive AM1535-: CVA 99-295
Prince Arthur of Connaught, September 1912. Stuart Thomson / Vancouver Archive AM1535-: CVA 99-295 Photo by Stuart Thomson / /jpg
Reception at the HRH Duke of Connaught in front of the Vancouver Courthouse on Georgia Street on September 12, 1912. Vancouver Archive AM1376-: CVA 189-1
Reception at the HRH Duke of Connaught in front of the Vancouver Courthouse on Georgia Street on September 12, 1912. Vancouver Archive AM1376-: CVA 189-1 jpg
Illuminated arch on Hastings Street for a visit by Governor Connaught, September 19, 1912. Vancouver Archive AM54-S4-: LGN 1018
Illuminated arch on Hastings Street for a visit by Governor Connaught, September 19, 1912. Vancouver Archive AM54-S4-: LGN 1018 jpg
Vancouver Courthouse illuminated at night for the Governor's visit in September 1912. Stuart Thomson / Vancouver Archive AM1535-: CVA 99-293
Vancouver Courthouse illuminated at night for the Governor’s visit in September 1912. Stuart Thomson / Vancouver Archive AM1535-: CVA 99-293 Photo by Stuart Thomson / /jpg
Duke of Connaught, 18.9.12 inspecting honor guards at the courthouse. Stuart Thomson / Vancouver Archives AM1535-: CVA 99-310
Duke of Connaught, 18.9.12 inspecting honor guards at the courthouse. Stuart Thomson / Vancouver Archives AM1535-: CVA 99-310 jpg
The Canadian Pacific Railway Station at the foot of Granville is decorated for a visit by the Duke of Connaught. The list in the Vancouver Archive says 1900, which is probably Duke's 1906 visit, or 1912. The banner says
The Canadian Pacific Railway Station at the foot of Granville is decorated for a visit by the Duke of Connaught. The list in the Vancouver Archive says 1900, which is probably Duke’s 1906 visit, or 1912. The banner says “Her Majesty”, but in 1900 Queen Victoria was still alive and she was written “Her Majesty”. Queen. “British Columbia Sugar Refining Company Limited / Vancouver Archive AM1592-1-S2-F05-: 2011-092.0295 jpg
Her Majesty Queen Victoria, circa 1887-88. Vancouver Archive AM54-S4-2-: CVA 371-695
Her Majesty Queen Victoria, circa 1887-88. Vancouver Archive AM54-S4-2-: CVA 371-695 jpg
CPR Station and Dock, Vancouver, 1889 or 1890. Bailey and Neelands / Vancouver Archive AM1376-: CVA 1376-375.17
CPR Station and Dock, Vancouver, 1889 or 1890. Bailey and Neelands / Vancouver Archive AM1376-: CVA 1376-375.17
The front page of Vancouver World on September 18, 1912. We welcomed the Duke of Connaught to the city. The Duke was the governor at the time.
The front page of Vancouver World on September 18, 1912. We welcomed the Duke of Connaught to the city. The Duke was the governor at the time.

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